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Shari Veil

Professor, Department Chair, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Affairs


Office: 263 Blazer Dining

Phone: 859-218-0468

Email: Shari.Veil [at] uky.edu

Personal Website: http://comm.uky.edu/veil

Education
B.S., University of Mary; MBA, University of Mary; Ph.D., North Dakota State University

Specialties
Risk and crisis communication: Organizational learning in high-risk environments; community preparedness; communication strategies for crisis management

Bio
Shari R. Veil, MBA, Ph.D., is a Professor and Chair in the Department of Communication and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Affairs in the College of Communication and Information at the University of Kentucky where she oversees the recruitment, advisement, and retention of over 2000 undergraduate students in five majors, four minors, and two undergraduate certificates and teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in risk and crisis, organizational, and mass communication. Dr. Veil formerly served as the Director of the Risk Sciences Division (now the Risk and Disaster Communication Center) coordinating research, funding, graduate education, and training programs specific to risk and crisis communication. Her academic program development and research on organizational learning in high-risk environments, community preparedness, and communication strategies for crisis management has been supported by over $1.9 million in grants and contracts and resulted in over 80 scholarly publications. Dr. Veil is research chair of the National Communication Association Public Relations Division and serves locally on the Lexington-Fayette Emergency Planning Committee and Community Emergency Response Team.

Awards
College of Communication and Information Excellence in Research Award 2013; Highly Commended Article Award, Journal of Communication Management 2013; Top Paper in Public Relations, International Academy of Business Disciplines 2011 ; Top Paper, Public Relations Division, National Communication Association 2010; Top Paper, Applied Communications Division, National Communication Association 2010

Curriculum Vitae


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Courses Taught

An introduction to the process of communication as a critical element in human interaction and in society. Designed to enhance effective communication and informed use of the mass media.
A course designed to give the student platform experience in the fundamentals of effective speaking.
Preparation for and participation in intercollegiate debating. May be repeated to a maximum of two credits.
Introduces students to fundamental oral communication skills needed to prepare and present messages effectively. Note: This course will not substitute for the three-credit course COM 181, Basic Public Speaking. It will count toward partial completion of the oral communication skills component of the University Studies Program.
An examination of the interplay between the technology and content of the mass communication media.
This writing intensive course examines basic verbal and nonverbal concepts affecting the communication process between individuals in various interpersonal contexts. Course also requires participation in written and oral activities designed to develop and improve interpersonal skills. Topics may include: perspective-taking, relationship and conversation management, effective listening, conflict management, communication climate, communication anxiety, and cultural/gender differences in interpersonal communication.
A study of communication processes in small group situations. Topics include conflict, leadership, and decision-making. Students will participate in group discussion and develop skills in analyzing group performance.
Preparation for and participation in intercollegiate debating. May be repeated to a maximum of four credits.
Study of the phonetic structure of English language with requirement of mastery of international Phonetic Alphabet. Emphasis will be placed on phonetic transcription, and application will be made for students interested in general speech, speech correction, radio, television, and theater.
A study of the processes involved in attitude change, with emphasis on the preparation and delivery of persuasive messages.
Designed to introduce students to basic concepts in the study of organizational communication. The course considers approaches to the practice and study of communication within organizational settings, including classical approach, human relations, human resources approaches, systems approaches, cultural approaches, and critical approaches. It also introduces specific issues within the study of organizational communication, including assimilation, decision-making, conflict, change, emotion, cultural diversity and communication technologies.
An introductory survey course covering syntactic, semantic and pragmatic aspects of language as they relate to communication. Language learning, sign typologies, psycho-linguistics, and the nature of meaning are selected topic areas. Emphasis is on behavioral, communication approach.
Considers various theoretical perspectives which lead to a more thorough understanding of communication processes. Begins with discussion of the development of theory and inquiry. Includes perspectives of systems, cognitive, behavioral, affective, symbolic interactionist, dramatic, cultural and social reality, interpretive and critical theories.
An introduction to the methods of philosophy of scientific research into the origins, nature, and effects of communication processes. Provides skills necessary for designing research projects and for interpreting and critically evaluating research results.
Research and study of special topics in communication. The student proposes the specific study to be undertaken and formally contracts with a faculty supervisor for guidance and evaluation. Ordinarily, projects will require the production of written materials as a basis for the evaluation. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
Provides field-based experience in communication through work in industry, government, education, etc. Pass-fail only. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. A maximum of three credit hours may be counted toward the communication major. For more information, visit the internship website at http://comm.uky.edu/intern.
This course examines the relationship between the organization of modern society and its communication media with special emphasis on cultural processes and social change. The social-psychological bases of communication are studied within a context of theory and research.
Examines current theory and research on the nature and development of interpersonal communication ability. Topics include: understanding strategic communicative relational communication elements, and cultural and institutional influences on the development of interpersonal communication.
A course designed to examine theory and research related to criticism of the mass media and to the relationship of digital and mass communication to contemporary social issues.
Intensive study of a communication topic in professional, theoretical, and research methodology areas of communication.
An overview of problems, issues, processes and assumptions involved with communicating across cultures and co-cultures. Theories of cognition and communication will be used to explore and explain communication with people from diverse cultures. Differences in both verbal and nonverbal communication among different cultural groups will be discussed.
This course examines theory and research of persuasion. Topics include message characteristics, credibility, compliance-gaining, decision- making and motivational appeals.
Examines theory and research relevant to understanding advanced issues in organizational communication. Topics may include strategies of innovation, organizing, networking, decision-making, globalization, technology, power, and diversity.
Examines theory and research relevant to the role of interpersonal communication in managing mental and physical health. Topics related to interaction in health contexts include: communicating identity in health and illness, health and personal relationships, health care provider/ patient communication, medical decision-making, and interpersonal health education and prevention efforts.
Examines theory and research on the nature and development of small group communication. Topics include leadership, interpersonal relations and roles, goals, and decision-making in multiple organizational contexts.
This course uses communication research and theory to develop effective instructors of communication. Topics include instructor identity, course development, teaching communication contexts (e.g., small group, intercultural, persuasion, speech) in diverse settings (e.g., classroom, organizational training), managing learners, and learning assessment.
A study of the ways in which the communications media play their roles in contemporary society with special attention to the major functions, rights, and responsibilities of media and individuals.
The course reviews existing and emerging theoretical, perspectives relevant to the context of interpersonal communication. Emphasis is on theories of message production and reception, identity management, relationship development, and related processes. Methods of investigation unique to the study of interpersonal interaction are also addressed. Students are expected to be familiar with general communication theory and basic research methods prior to enrolling in the course.
A course examining the structure, development and evolution of the Internet; network protocols and client/server architecture issues; Web page design, authoring, and evaluation; the use of the Internet as an information storage and retrieval system; recent advances in HTML and scripting languages; and Internet related social issues such as censorship and copyright.
Examination and critical analysis of the major theories of communication processes, including systems theory, structural theories and semiotics, behaviorism, symbolic interactionism, theories of the social construction of reality, and other theoretical approaches to the study of communication.
The scientific method. Communication research as part of social science research. Study and practice of quantitative behavioral research techniques which apply to communication.
Study of concepts and methods of information system design and development with particular relevance to library and information center applications. Emphasis is given to modeling of system functions, data, and processes of computer-based information systems including the development of small scale information systems.
This course is designed to provide a broad introduction to communication in a health care context. Topics addressed are patient-provider communication, small group communication, communication in health care organizations, intercultural communication in health care, and health images in the mass media.
Intensive study of one aspect of library and information science under the leadership of an authority in the area. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours when topics vary.
Field experience for candidates for the M.A. degree in any field of communications through work in industry, government, education, research or business agencies. Laboratory, 12 hours per week.
Individual reading study on some communications aspects not treated in depth in a regular course or of topical interest. Advance consultation regarding reading list and examination procedure required.
Special Topics/Issues in International/Intercultural Communication examines the current and the alternative perspectives in the field of study. Topics/Issues such as the New World Information and Communication Order, Information/Communication Technologies, Communication and Development, Transborder Data Flows, etc., are studied.
Consideration of selected topics in mass communication theory and research. May be repeated under a different subtitle to a maximum of six credits.
Half-time to full-time work on thesis. May be repeated to a maximum of six semesters.
Half-time to full-time work on dissertation. May be repeated to a maximum of six semesters.
Intensive examination of selected topics important to the construction, development, and testing of communication theories and problems.
Residency credit for dissertation research after the qualifying examination.
May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours.
Professors will conduct research seminars in topics or problems in which they have special research interests.
To provide advanced students with an opportunity for independent work to be conducted in regular consultation with the instructor.
Significant participation in important aspects of a research project under the direction of a graduate faculty member.
A broad examination and critical analysis of major mass communication theories and research areas.
Goals, epistemology and methods of qualitative inquiry in communication. Strengths and limitations of different qualitative research methodologies. Distinctive contributions of qualitative research to theory and practice of communication.
An advanced course examining the literature in communication and attitude change. Issues in measurement, theory, and philosophical orientation are central. Covers communication broadly, including interpersonal, mediated, and mass communication.

Peer Reviewed Journal Articles

*Woods, C. L., & Veil, S. R. (in press). Balancing transparency and privacy in a university sexual misconduct case: A legal public relations case study. Journal of International Crisis & Risk Communication.

*Roberts, H. A., & Veil, S. R. (2016). Health literacy and crisis: Public relations in the 2010 Egg Recall. Public Relations Review, 42(1), 214-218. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2015.07.013.

*Iannarino, N., Veil, S. R., & *Cotton, A. (2015). Bringing home the crisis: How U.S. evening news framed the 2011 Japan nuclear crisis. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 23(3), 169-181. doi:10.1111/1468-5973.12068

*Cotton, A., Veil, S. R., & *Iannarino, N. (2015). Contaminated communication: TEPCO and organizational renewal at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Communication Studies, 66(1), 27-44. doi:10.1080/10510974.2013.811427

Veil, S. R., *Reno, J., *Freihaut, R., & *Oldham, J. (2015). Online activists vs. Kraft Foods: A case of social media hijacking. Public Relations Review, 41(1), 103-108. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2014.11.017

Veil, S. R., & *Anthony, K. E. (2017). Exploring public relations challenges in a compounding crisis: The pariah effect of toxic trailers. Journal of Public Relations Research, 29(4), 141-157. doi:10.1080/1062726X.2017.1355805

Yang, A., & Veil, S. R. (2017). Nationalism versus animal rights: A semantic network analysis of value advocacy in corporate crisis. International Journal of Business Communication, 54(4), 408-430. doi:10.1177/2329488415572781

Veil, S. R. & Bishop, B. W. (2014). Opportunities and challenges for public libraries to enhance community resilience. Risk Analysis, 34(4), 721-734. doi: 10.1111/risa.12130

*Wombacher, K., *Reno, J., & Veil, S. R. (2017). Neknominate: Social norms, social media and binge drinking. Health Communication, 32(5), 596-602. doi:10.1080/10410236.2016.1146567

Frisby, B. N., Veil, S. R., & Sellnow, T. L. (2014). Instruction in health-related crises: Essential information for self-protection. Health Communication, 29(4), 347-354. doi: 10.1080/10410236.2012.755604

*Herovic, E., & Veil, S. R. (2016). Some lines bring us together: Sport as crisis renewal in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Communication, Culture, and Critique, 9(4), 517-536. doi:10.1111/cccr.12138

Veil, S. R., *Dillingham, L. L., & Sloan, A. G. (2016). Fencing out the Jones’s: The development of response strategies for spillover crises. Corporate Reputation Review, 19(4), 316-330. doi:10.1057/s41299-016-0010-3

Ivanov, B., Burns, W. J., Sellnow, T. L., Petrun-Sayers, E. L., & Veil, S. R., Mayorga, M. W. (2016). Using an inoculation message approach to promote public confidence in protective agencies. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 44(4), 381-398. doi:10.1080/00909882.2016.1225165

*Roberts, H. A., & Veil, S. R. (2016). Health literacy and crisis: Public relations in the 2010 Egg Recall. Public Relations Review, 42(1), 214-218. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2015.07.013.

*Iannarino, N., Veil, S. R., & *Cotton, A. (2015). Bringing home the crisis: How U.S. evening news framed the 2011 Japan nuclear crisis. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 23(3), 169-181. doi:10.1111/1468-5973.12068

*Cotton, A., Veil, S. R., & *Iannarino, N. (2015). Contaminated communication: TEPCO and organizational renewal at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Communication Studies, 66(1), 27-44. doi:10.1080/10510974.2013.811427

Veil, S. R., *Reno, J., *Freihaut, R., & *Oldham, J. (2015). Online activists vs. Kraft Foods: A case of social media hijacking. Public Relations Review, 41(1), 103-108. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2014.11.017

Veil, S. R. & Bishop, B. W. (2014). Opportunities and challenges for public libraries to enhance community resilience. Risk Analysis, 34(4), 721-734. doi: 10.1111/risa.12130

Frisby, B. N., Sellnow, D. D., Lane, D. R., Veil, S. R., & Sellnow, T. L. (2013). Instruction in crisis: Targeting learning preferences and efficacy. Risk Management, 15(4), 250-271. doi:10.1057/rm.2013.7

Veil, S. R., Sellnow, T. L., & *Wickline, M. C. (2013). BP: An egregious violation of the ethic of first and second things. Business & Society Review, 118(3), 361-381. doi: 10.1111/basr.12014

*Freeberg, K., Palenchar, M. J., & Veil, S. R. (2013). Managing and sharing H1N1 crisis information using social media bookmarking services. Public Relations Review, 39(3), 178-184. doi: 10.1016/j.pubrev.2013.02.2007

Bishop, B. W., & Veil, S. R. (2013). Public libraries as post crisis information hubs. Public Libraries Quarterly, 32(1), 33-45. doi: 10.1080/01616846.2013.760390

Veil, S. R. & *Yang, A. (2012). Media manipulation in the Sanlu milk contamination crisis. Public Relations Review, 38(5), 935-937. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2012.08.004

Veil, S. R., *Petrun, E. L., & *Roberts, H. A. (2012). Issue management gone awry: When not to respond to an online reputation threat. Corporate Reputation Review, 15(4), 319-332. doi:10.1057/crr.2012.18

Veil, S. R. (2012). Clearing the air: Journalists and emergency managers discuss disaster response. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 40(3), 289-306. doi:10.1080/00909882.2012.679672

Veil, S. R., Sellnow, T. L., & *Petrun, E. L. (2012). Hoaxes and the paradoxical challenges of restoring legitimacy: DominosÕ response to its YouTube crisis. Management Communication Quarterly, 26(2), 322-345. doi:10.1177/0893318911426685

Veil, S. R., & *Husted, R. A. (2012). Best practices as an assessment for crisis communication. Journal of Communication Management, 16(2), 131-145. doi:10.1108/13632541211217560

Veil, S. R., *Buehner, T., & Palenchar, M. (2011). A work in-progress literature review: Incorporating social media in risk and crisis communication. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 19(2), 110-122. DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-5973.2011.00639.x

Veil, S. R., Sellnow, T. L., & *Heald, M. (2011). Memorializing crisis: The Oklahoma National Memorial as renewal discourse. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 39(2), 164- 183. doi:10.1080/00909882.2011.557390

Veil, S. R. (2011). Mindful learning in crisis management. Journal of Business Communication, 48(2), 116-147. doi:10.1177/0021943610382294

*Millner, A. G., Veil, S. R., & Sellnow, T. L. (2011). Proxy communication in crisis response. Public Relations Review, 37(1), 74-76. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2010.10.005

Veil, S. R., & *Mitchell, K. (2010). Terror management theory: Promoting tolerance in campus safety campaigns. International Journal of Strategic Communication, 4(4), 207-224. doi:10.1080/1553118X.2010.515541

Veil, S. R., & *Ojeda, F. (2010). Establishing media partnerships in crisis response. Communication Studies, 60(4), 412-429. doi:10.1080/10510974.2010.491336

Veil, S. R., & *Rodgers, J. E. (2010). Reaching at risk populations: The inconsistency of communication channels among American Indian tribes in Oklahoma. Public Relations Review, 36(3), 302-305. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2010.04.002

Veil, S. R. (2010). Using crisis simulations in public relations education. Communication Teacher, 24(2), 58-62. doi:10.1080/17404621003680906

Veil, S. R. (2010). Identifying adoption barriers in organizational rhetoric: A response to the strategic plan for the National Animal Identification System. Journal of Applied Communications, 94(1&2), 33-48.

Veil, S. R. (2010). Adoption barriers in a high-risk agricultural environment. International Journal of Technology and Human Interaction, 6(1), 69-85. doi:10.4018/jthi.2010091705

Veil, S. R., Littlefield, R. S., & Rowan, K. E. (2009). Dissemination as success: Local emergency management communication practices. Public Relations Review, 35(4), 449-451. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2009.06.004

Veil, S. R., Reynolds, B., Sellnow, T. L., & Seeger, M. W. (2008). Crisis & Emergency Risk Communication as a theoretical framework for research and practice. Health Promotion Practice, 9(4), 26S-34S. doi:10.1177/1524839908322113

Veil, S. R. (2008). Civic responsibility in risk democracy. Public Relations Review, 34(4), 387-391. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2008.08.001

Veil, S. R., & Kent, M. (2008). Issues management and inoculation: TylenolÕs responsible dosing advertising. Public Relations Review, 34(4), 399-402. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2008.08.004

Veil, S. R., & Sellnow, T. L. (2008). Organizational learning in a high-risk environment: Responding to an anthrax outbreak. Journal of Applied Communications, 92(1), 75-93.

Veil, S. R. (2007). Mayhem in the Magic City: Rebuilding legitimacy in a communication train wreck. Public Relations Review, 33(3), 337-339. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2007.05.015

Streifel, R. A., Beebe, B. L., Veil, S. R., & Sellnow, T. L. (2006). Significant choice and crisis decision making: MeritCareÕs public communication in the Fen-Phen case. Journal of Business Ethics, 69(4), 389-397. doi:10.1007/s10551-006-9097-2

Venette, S. J., Veil, S. R., & Sellnow, T. L. (2005). Essential communication resources for combating bioterrorism: Some practical and generalizable recommendations. Communication Research Reports, 22, 29-37. doi:10.1080/0882409052000343499

Veil, S. R. (2005). To answer or not to answer Ð that is the question of the hour: Image restoration strategies and media coverage of past drug use questions in the presidential campaigns of Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Speaker and Gavel, 42, 58-78.

*Zou, L., & Veil, S. R. (2007). Guerrilla marketing and the Aqua Teen Hunger Force fiasco. Public Relations Quarterly, 51(4), 8-11.

Veil, S. R., Liu, M., Erickson, S. & Sellnow, T. (2005). Too hot to handle: Competency constrains character in Chi-ChiÕs green onion crisis. Public Relations Quarterly, 50(4), 19-22.

Veil, S. R., Liu, M., Erickson, S. & Sellnow, T. (2005). Too hot to handle: Competency constrains character in Chi-ChiÕs green onion crisis. Public Relations Quarterly, 50(4), 19-22.

Veil, S. R., *Woods, C. L., & Hecht, R. D. (2018). The journalist as the audience: Evaluating the U.S. Navy’s “Sailor for a Day” campaign. Public Relations Review, 44(5), 717-723. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2018.08.010

Edited Book Chapters

Veil, S. R., *Anthony, K., Sellnow, T. L., *Staricek, N., *Young, L., & Cupp, P. (under contract, with the editors). Revisiting the best practices in risk and crisis communication: A multi-case analysis. In H. D. O’Hair & M. J. O’Hair (Eds.), Handbook of applied communication research. New York: Wiley.

Veil, S. R., & *Ambrose, K. (under contract, with the editors). Communicating in supply chain crises. In F. Frandsen & W. Johansen (Eds.), Handbook of crisis communication. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.

Veil, S. R., & Dillingham, L. (under contract, with the editors). Spillover crises. In F. Frandsen & W. Johansen (Eds.), Handbook of crisis communication. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.

Savage, M., *Jones, S., *Reno, J., & Veil, S. R. (2017). A case study: Targeting the Stop.Think.Connect. cybersecurity campaign to university campuses. In R. L. Parrott (Ed.), The Oxford encyclopedia of health and risk message design and processing (pp. 277-291). New York: Oxford University Press.

Sutton, J., & Veil, S. R. (2017). Risk communication and the social media. In R. Kasperson (Ed), Risk conundrums: Solving unsolvable problems (pp. 96-111). New York: Earthscan Routledge.

Sellnow, T. L., & Veil, S. R. (2016). Preparing for international and cross-cultural crises: The role of competing voices, inclusivity, and the interplay of responsibility in global organizations. In A. Schwarz, M. Seeger, C. Auer (Eds.). Handbook of international crisis communication research (pp. 489-498). New York: Wiley Blackwell.

Veil, S. R. (2015). Learning: Beyond the ideals of mindful learning. Generating actionable strategies for crisis management from organizational knowledge. In N. Schiffino, L. Taskin, C. Donis, & J. Raone, & (Eds). Organization after crisis: The challenge of learning (pp. 55-74). Brussels: Peter Lang International.

*Roberts, H. A., & Veil, S. R. (2015). The tension of emotional connection: Health literacy and the 2010 Salmonella egg recall. In R. S. Littlefield & T. L. Sellnow (Eds.). Risk and crisis communication: Navigating the tensions between organizations and the public (123-138). Laham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

Veil, S. R., & Sellnow, T. L. (2015). Risk and crisis communication. In N. G. Harrington (Ed.). Health communication: Theory, method, and application (454-482). New York: Routledge.

Sellnow, T. L., & Veil, S. R., & *Anthony, K. (2013). Experiencing the reputational synergy of success and failure through organizational learning. In C. E. Carroll (Ed.), Handbook of communication and corporate reputation (pp. 235-248). New York: Wiley-Blackwell.

Sellnow, T. L., *Wickline, M., & Veil, S. R. (2013). Responding effectively to crises: Best practices in organizational crisis communication (pp. 235-252). In J. S. Wrench (Ed.), Workplace communication for the 21st century: Tools and strategies that impact the bottom line. New York: Praeger.

Veil, S. R. (2012). Expert response to ÒA triple disaster in one fell swoop: Rethinking crisis communication in Japan after March 11.Ó In A. George and C. Pratt (Eds.), Case studies in crisis communication: International perspectives on hits and misses (pp. 225-226). New York: Routledge.

Veil, S. R., & *Yang, A. (2012). Sanlu GroupÕs milk contamination crisis: Organizational communication in conflicting contexts. In S. May (Ed.). Case studies in organizational communication: Ethical perspectives and practices (pp. 111-118). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Veil, S. R., *Mitcham, C., & Sellnow, T. L. (2012). Lost in translation: How emergency managers understand multicultural communication in emergency preparedness. In B. Olaniran, D. Williams, & W. T. Coombs (Eds.), Pre crisis management: Preparing for the inevitable (pp. 201-225). New York: Peter Lang Publishing.

Kent, M. L., Taylor, M., & Veil, S. R. (2011). Issues management makeover: A facelift for an aging theory. In M. Goralski, H. P. LeBlanc III, & M. L. Adams (Eds.), Business research yearbook: Balancing profitability and sustainability: Shaping the future of business, 18(2), (pp. 534Ð541). Beltsville, MD: International Academy of Business Disciplines.

Sellnow, T. L., Veil, S. R., Streifel, R. A., & Johnson, C. L. (2010). Credibility seeking through an inter-organizational alliance: Instigating the Fen-Phen confrontation crisis. In W. T. Coombs & S. J. Holladay (Eds.), Handbook of crisis communication (pp. 657-674). New York: Wiley-Blackwell.

Littlefield, R., Rowan, K., Veil, S. R., Kisselburgh, L., Beauchamp, K., Vidoloff, K., Dick, M. L., Russell-Loretz, T., Kim, I., Ruvarac, A., Wang, Q., Cho, H., Siriko Hoang, T., Neff, B., Toles- Patkin, T., Troester, R. L., Hyder, S., Venette, S. & Sellnow, T. L. (2010). ÒWe tell people. ItÕs up to them to be preparedÓ: Public relations practices of local emergency managers. In W. T. Coombs & S. J. Holladay (Eds.), Handbook of crisis communication (pp. 245-260). New York: Wiley-Blackwell.

Sellnow, T. L., Ulmer, R. R., Seeger, M. W., & Veil, S. R. (2008). Terrorism as chaos: A chaos model for managing random acts of terror. In D. O'Hair, R. Heath, K. Ayotte, & G. Ledlow (Eds.), Terrorism: Communication and rhetorical perspectives (pp. 411-424). Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Translational Research / Trade Journal Articles

Veil, S. R., (2012, August). Journalists and emergency managers discuss disaster response. Communication Currents, 7(4), [online] Retrieved from http://www.natcom.org/CommCurrentsArticle.aspx?id=2645

Sellnow, T. L., & Veil, S. R. (2012, March). Broadcasting food safety: How to push critical self-protection messages. Dairy Response Update. [online] Retrieved from http://sites.redwoodeditor.com/dmi-quarterly-newsletters/march-2012-subpage/ Veil, S. R., & Sellnow, T. L. (2011, June). Renewal discourse in memorializing crisis. Communication Currents, 6(3). [online] Retrieved from http://www.natcom.org/CommCurrentsArticle.aspx?id=1032

Sellnow, T. L. & Veil, S. R., (2011). Implementing an effective risk communication plan. Chinese Food Technology, 14-18.

Veil, S. R., & Schauer, C. S. (2008). Response of North Dakota Lamb and Wool Producer Association members to the National Animal Identification System Strategic Plan (NAIS). Sheep Research Report, 49, 7-12

Ivanov, B., Burns, W. J., Sellnow, T. L., Petrun-Sayers, E. L., & Veil, S. R., Mayorga, M. W. (2016, December). Using inoculation as a pre-crisis strategy. Communication Currents, [online] Retrieved from https://www.natcom.org/communication-currents/using-inoculation-messages-pre-crisis-strategy/

Veil S. R., & *Reno, J. (2015, October). Research summary: Social media hijacking. Institute for Public Relations: Signature Studies. [online] Retrieved from http://www.instituteforpr.org/ online-activists-vs-kraft-foods-a-case-of-social-media-hijacking/

Cupp, P., Anyaegbunam, C., Hoover, A., Madinger, C., Veil, S. R., Sellnow, T., O’Hair, D. (2015). Community engagement and case analysis methods for developing post-incident risk communication strategies for intentional biological environmental contamination incidents. Cincinnati, OH: Environmental Protection Agency.

Encyclopedia Entries

Veil, S. R., & *Woods, C. L. (2018). Resilience. In R. L. Heath & W. Johansen (Eds.), International encyclopedia of strategic communication. New York: Wiley-Blackwell. [online] doi: 10.1002/9781119010722

Veil, S. R. (2016). Reputation Crisis. In C. E. Carroll (Ed.), Encyclopedia of corporate reputation (pp. 637-639). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Veil, S. R. (2013). Community resilience. In R. L. Heath & M. J. Palenchar (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Public Relations (pp. 793-794). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Veil, S. R. (2013). Emergency management. In R. L. Heath & M. J. Palenchar (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Public Relations (p. 285). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Veil, S. R. (2013). Cascading crisis. In B. K. Penuel, M. Statier, & R. Hagen (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Crisis Management (pp. 96-98). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Veil, S. R. (2013). Routine emergencies vs. true crises. In B. K. Penuel, M. Statier, & R. Hagen (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Crisis Management (pp. 845-847). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Veil, S. R. (2013). Spokespersons. In B. K. Penuel, M. Statier, & R. Hagen (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Crisis Management (pp. 892-896). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Veil, S. R. (2010). Chernobyl. In S. H. Priest (Ed.), Encyclopedia of science and technology communication (pp. 123-126). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Veil, S. R. (2010). Department of Agriculture, US. In S. H. Priest (Ed.), Encyclopedia of science and technology communication (pp. 211-213). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Technical/Government Reports

Cupp, P., Veil, S. R., Sellnow, T., *Anthony, K., *Staricek, N., & *Young, L. (2013). Case analysis of community engagement a for developing post-incident risk communication guidelines. Cincinnati, OH: Environmental Protection Agency.

Veil, S. R., & *Young, L. (2013). Internal communication audit of the Lexington Fire Department. Lexington, KY: Risk Sciences Division.

Veil, S. R., & Bishop, B. W. (2012). Community resilience and public libraries: Post crisis information and connectivity. Boulder, CO: Natural Hazards Center.

Benoit, W., Carlton, T., Church, S., Comfort, L., Fearn-Banks, K., Fischhoff, B., Friemuth, V., Gable, L., Gouran, D. S., Granillo, B., Hearit, K., Heath, R., OÕToole, T., Palenchar, M., Pechta, L., Perrow, C., Petrun, E., Riad, J., Seeger, M., Sellnow, T. L., Stacks, D., Sutton, J., Ulmer, R., Venette, S., Veil, S. R., Witte, K., & Worley, D. (2012). Crisis & emergency risk communication: 2012 edition. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at http://emergency.cdc.gov/cerc/pdf/CERC_2012edition.pdf

Solis, P., Palacious, F. A., Bach, B., Mutis, S. B., Andreas, D. C., Broad, G., Burton, C., Campbell, D., Chavez Michaelsen, A. B., Coles, A., Colten, C., Coronel, C., Cutter, S., Diaz, R., Eosco, G., Esquivel, M., Finley-Brook, M., Frazier, T., Haeffner, M., Heslop-Thomas, C., Howe, P., Janes, E., Kidd, N., Languna, D., Martinez, N., Metternicht, G., Montana, E., Murtinho, F., Norton, T., Nunez, J., OÕHair, D., Paras, M., Parcher, J., Ramirez, I. J., Reyes, C., Hernandez, H. R., Rowe, D., Ruiz, J., Sausen, T. M., Caballero, D. S., Sprain, L., Tambie, J., Tate, E., Tiefenbacher, J., Veil, S. R., Viand, J. M., Weathers, M., Wilson, S., Wood, N., Yarnal, B., Yuan, M. (2010). Climate change and hazards in the Americas: International interdisciplinary research directions and opportunities. Washington D. C.: Association of American Geographers.

Veil, S. R., McWaters-Khalousi, S., *Ploeger, N., *Adame, B., *Kelly, K., *Lockhart, L., *Siddons, J., & Tovstiadi, K. (2009). State Continuity Implementation Plan. Norman, OK: Center for Risk and Crisis Management.

OÕHair, H. D., Veil, S. R., *Adame, B., *Bernard, D., *Eosco, G., Martyn-Farwell, K., *Ploeger, N., & Tovstiadi, K. (2008). Oklahoma Homeland Security Regional Council/ Response Workshop: Analytical Report, 1. Norman, OK: Center for Risk and Crisis Management.