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Nancy Harrington

Professor, Associate Dean for Research


Office: 273 Blazer Dining

Phone: 859-257-2295

Email: Nancy.Harrington [at] uky.edu

Personal Website: http://comm.uky.edu/harrington

Education
B.A. 1986, M.A. 1987, University of Cincinnati; Ph.D. 1992, University of Kentucky

Specialties
Health communication, persuasive message design, tailored messaging, physician-patient communication

Bio
Nancy Grant Harrington (PhD, 1992, University of Kentucky) is Professor of Communication, Director of the Health Communication Research Collaborative, Associate Dean for Research in the College of Communication and Information, and University Research Professor at the University of Kentucky. She also holds an academic appointment in the School of Public Health and is a faculty associate of the Multidisciplinary Center on Drug and Alcohol Research. Dr. Harrington’s research focuses on persuasive message design in the health behavior change context, particularly as it relates to risk behavior prevention/health promotion. She has been a principal investigator, co-investigator, or principal evaluator on several NIH-funded and CDC-funded studies totaling nearly $9 million. She has published more than 70 journal articles or chapters in outlets such as Health Communication, Communication Monographs, Communication Yearbook, and Health Education & Behavior. She is co-editor of eHealth Applications: Promising Strategies for Behavior Change (Routledge, 2012) and editor of Health Communication: Theory, Method, and Application (Routledge, 2015). Dr. Harrington serves on the editorial boards of several journals, including Health Communication, Prevention Science, and Science Communication. She served as guest editor for special issues of Journal of Communication (“Communication Strategies to Reduce Health Disparities,” 2013) and Health Communication (“Message Design in Health Communication Research,” 2015). She served as chair to the Health Communication division of the National Communication Association from 2004-2005, and she is a founding member and steering committee member of the Society for Health Communication. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in persuasive message design, health communication, communication theory, and research methods.

Awards
NCA Health Communication Interest Group Dale E. Brashers Distinguished Mentor Award. 2016; University of Cincinnati’s “50 Communication Alumni Champions” 2014

Curriculum Vitae


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Kentucky Prescription Drug Overdose Prevention Program

Researchers: Nancy Harrington

Sponsors: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Dates: January 1, 2018 to January 1, 2020


Advancing Health Communication Research Through the KCHC-DCHC Conference Series

Researchers: Nancy Harrington PI, Scott Johnson

Sponsors: National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Dates: September 1, 2012 to March 31, 2023


Courses Taught

An introduction to the process of communication as a critical element in human interaction and in society. Designed to enhance effective communication and informed use of the mass media.
A course designed to give the student platform experience in the fundamentals of effective speaking.
Preparation for and participation in intercollegiate debating. May be repeated to a maximum of two credits.
Introduces students to fundamental oral communication skills needed to prepare and present messages effectively. Note: This course will not substitute for the three-credit course COM 181, Basic Public Speaking. It will count toward partial completion of the oral communication skills component of the University Studies Program.
An examination of the interplay between the technology and content of the mass communication media.
This writing intensive course examines basic verbal and nonverbal concepts affecting the communication process between individuals in various interpersonal contexts. Course also requires participation in written and oral activities designed to develop and improve interpersonal skills. Topics may include: perspective-taking, relationship and conversation management, effective listening, conflict management, communication climate, communication anxiety, and cultural/gender differences in interpersonal communication.
A study of communication processes in small group situations. Topics include conflict, leadership, and decision-making. Students will participate in group discussion and develop skills in analyzing group performance.
Preparation for and participation in intercollegiate debating. May be repeated to a maximum of four credits.
Study of the phonetic structure of English language with requirement of mastery of international Phonetic Alphabet. Emphasis will be placed on phonetic transcription, and application will be made for students interested in general speech, speech correction, radio, television, and theater.
A study of the processes involved in attitude change, with emphasis on the preparation and delivery of persuasive messages.
Designed to introduce students to basic concepts in the study of organizational communication. The course considers approaches to the practice and study of communication within organizational settings, including classical approach, human relations, human resources approaches, systems approaches, cultural approaches, and critical approaches. It also introduces specific issues within the study of organizational communication, including assimilation, decision-making, conflict, change, emotion, cultural diversity and communication technologies.
An introductory survey course covering syntactic, semantic and pragmatic aspects of language as they relate to communication. Language learning, sign typologies, psycho-linguistics, and the nature of meaning are selected topic areas. Emphasis is on behavioral, communication approach.
Considers various theoretical perspectives which lead to a more thorough understanding of communication processes. Begins with discussion of the development of theory and inquiry. Includes perspectives of systems, cognitive, behavioral, affective, symbolic interactionist, dramatic, cultural and social reality, interpretive and critical theories.
An introduction to the methods of philosophy of scientific research into the origins, nature, and effects of communication processes. Provides skills necessary for designing research projects and for interpreting and critically evaluating research results.
Research and study of special topics in communication. The student proposes the specific study to be undertaken and formally contracts with a faculty supervisor for guidance and evaluation. Ordinarily, projects will require the production of written materials as a basis for the evaluation. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
Provides field-based experience in communication through work in industry, government, education, etc. Pass-fail only. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. A maximum of three credit hours may be counted toward the communication major. For more information, visit the internship website at http://comm.uky.edu/intern.
This course examines the relationship between the organization of modern society and its communication media with special emphasis on cultural processes and social change. The social-psychological bases of communication are studied within a context of theory and research.
Examines current theory and research on the nature and development of interpersonal communication ability. Topics include: understanding strategic communicative relational communication elements, and cultural and institutional influences on the development of interpersonal communication.
A course designed to examine theory and research related to criticism of the mass media and to the relationship of digital and mass communication to contemporary social issues.
Intensive study of a communication topic in professional, theoretical, and research methodology areas of communication.
An overview of problems, issues, processes and assumptions involved with communicating across cultures and co-cultures. Theories of cognition and communication will be used to explore and explain communication with people from diverse cultures. Differences in both verbal and nonverbal communication among different cultural groups will be discussed.
This course examines theory and research of persuasion. Topics include message characteristics, credibility, compliance-gaining, decision- making and motivational appeals.
Examines theory and research relevant to understanding advanced issues in organizational communication. Topics may include strategies of innovation, organizing, networking, decision-making, globalization, technology, power, and diversity.
Examines theory and research relevant to the role of interpersonal communication in managing mental and physical health. Topics related to interaction in health contexts include: communicating identity in health and illness, health and personal relationships, health care provider/ patient communication, medical decision-making, and interpersonal health education and prevention efforts.
Examines theory and research on the nature and development of small group communication. Topics include leadership, interpersonal relations and roles, goals, and decision-making in multiple organizational contexts.
This course uses communication research and theory to develop effective instructors of communication. Topics include instructor identity, course development, teaching communication contexts (e.g., small group, intercultural, persuasion, speech) in diverse settings (e.g., classroom, organizational training), managing learners, and learning assessment.
A study of the ways in which the communications media play their roles in contemporary society with special attention to the major functions, rights, and responsibilities of media and individuals.
The course reviews existing and emerging theoretical, perspectives relevant to the context of interpersonal communication. Emphasis is on theories of message production and reception, identity management, relationship development, and related processes. Methods of investigation unique to the study of interpersonal interaction are also addressed. Students are expected to be familiar with general communication theory and basic research methods prior to enrolling in the course.
A course examining the structure, development and evolution of the Internet; network protocols and client/server architecture issues; Web page design, authoring, and evaluation; the use of the Internet as an information storage and retrieval system; recent advances in HTML and scripting languages; and Internet related social issues such as censorship and copyright.
Examination and critical analysis of the major theories of communication processes, including systems theory, structural theories and semiotics, behaviorism, symbolic interactionism, theories of the social construction of reality, and other theoretical approaches to the study of communication.
The scientific method. Communication research as part of social science research. Study and practice of quantitative behavioral research techniques which apply to communication.
Study of concepts and methods of information system design and development with particular relevance to library and information center applications. Emphasis is given to modeling of system functions, data, and processes of computer-based information systems including the development of small scale information systems.
This course is designed to provide a broad introduction to communication in a health care context. Topics addressed are patient-provider communication, small group communication, communication in health care organizations, intercultural communication in health care, and health images in the mass media.
Intensive study of one aspect of library and information science under the leadership of an authority in the area. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours when topics vary.
Field experience for candidates for the M.A. degree in any field of communications through work in industry, government, education, research or business agencies. Laboratory, 12 hours per week.
Individual reading study on some communications aspects not treated in depth in a regular course or of topical interest. Advance consultation regarding reading list and examination procedure required.
Special Topics/Issues in International/Intercultural Communication examines the current and the alternative perspectives in the field of study. Topics/Issues such as the New World Information and Communication Order, Information/Communication Technologies, Communication and Development, Transborder Data Flows, etc., are studied.
Consideration of selected topics in mass communication theory and research. May be repeated under a different subtitle to a maximum of six credits.
Half-time to full-time work on thesis. May be repeated to a maximum of six semesters.
Half-time to full-time work on dissertation. May be repeated to a maximum of six semesters.
Intensive examination of selected topics important to the construction, development, and testing of communication theories and problems.
Residency credit for dissertation research after the qualifying examination.
May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours.
Professors will conduct research seminars in topics or problems in which they have special research interests.
To provide advanced students with an opportunity for independent work to be conducted in regular consultation with the instructor.
Significant participation in important aspects of a research project under the direction of a graduate faculty member.
A broad examination and critical analysis of major mass communication theories and research areas.
Goals, epistemology and methods of qualitative inquiry in communication. Strengths and limitations of different qualitative research methodologies. Distinctive contributions of qualitative research to theory and practice of communication.
An advanced course examining the literature in communication and attitude change. Issues in measurement, theory, and philosophical orientation are central. Covers communication broadly, including interpersonal, mediated, and mass communication.

Conference Paper and Poster Presentations (competitive unless otherwise noted)

Head, K. J., Cohen, E. L., & Harrington, N. G. (2015, April). Multiple messages make a difference: A message testing experiment on HPV vaccination intention. Poster presented at the biennial District of Columbia Health Communication Conference, Fairfax, VA.

Record, R. A., Helme, D., Harrington, N. G., & Savage, M. W. (2015, May). Using the theory of planned behavior to design messages aimed at increasing compliance with a tobacco-free policy. Paper presented at the International Communication Association Conference, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Record, R. A., Helme, D., Harrington, N. G., & Savage, M. W. (2015, November). Let's clear the air: A campaign that effectively increased compliance with a university’s tobacco-free policy. Paper presented at the National Communication Association convention, Las Vegas, NV.

Kerr, A. M., Harrington, N. G., & Scott, A. M. (2015, November). Communication and the reappraisal of uncertainty: Exploring parental uncertainty in the context of childhood illness and multidisciplinary care. Paper presented at the National Communication Association convention, Las Vegas, NV. Top Paper Award, Health Communication Division.

Dai, M., de la Serna, A., Yao, M., & Harrington, N. G. (2016, June). Exploring the cross-cultural differences in the relationship between condom knowledge, attitudes, and use among young women from China, India, and the United States. Paper to be presented at the International Communication Association Conference, Fukuoka, Japan.

Head, K. J., Noar, S. M., Iannarino, N. T., & Harrington, N. G. (2012, November). Efficacy of text messaging-based interventions for health promotion: A meta-analysis. Paper to be presented at the Annual Convention of the National Communication Association, Orlando, FL.

Record, R., & Harrington, N. G. (2012, May). Exposure to medical dramas and perception of medical miracles. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the International Communication Association, Phoenix, AZ.

Streeter, A. R., Harrington, N. G., & Lane, D. R. (2011, November). What nurses say: Communication behaviors associated with the competent nursing handoff. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the National Communication Association, New Orleans, LA.

Nickell, D. F., Arrington, M. I., & Harrington, N. G. (2011, April). Perceived risks and benefits for participants in informal medical consultations. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the Eastern Communication Association, Arlington, VA.

Nickell, D. F., Arrington, M. I., & Harrington, N. G. (2011, April). Screen door medicine: The informal medical consultation. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the Eastern Communication Association, Arlington, VA.

Huber, J., Harrington, N. G., Cupp, P. K., Norton, J. C., Harris, D., Parrish, A., & Rankin, A. (2011, March). Improving patient health literacy through exam room based technology. Poster presented at the second annual Kentucky Health Literacy Summit, Bowling Green, KY.

Harrington, N. G., & Noar, S. M. (2010, June). Reporting standards for studies of tailored interventions: A communication challenge. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the International Communication Association, Singapore.

Aldrich, R. S., & Harrington, N. G. (2009, November). Developing message content for suicide prevention. Paper presented in the Scholar-to-Scholar session at the Annual Convention of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL.

Gray, J. B., & Harrington, N. G. (2009, November). Narrative and framing: A test of an integrated message strategy in the exercise context. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL.

Norling, G. R., Harrington, N. G., & Parrish, A. (2009, November). ÒI would never get a catÓ: The relationship between pediatrician self-disclosure and parent satisfaction. Paper presented in the Scholar-to-Scholar session at the Annual Convention of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL.

Kelly, T.H., Harrington, N.G., Lane, D.R., Zimmerman, R.S., Lederer, K.M., & Martin, C.A. (2006, August). Experimental analysis of the effects of targeted media-based prevention messages on marijuana use by high-sensation and cognition-seeking young adults. Paper presented at the American Psychological Association, New Orleans, LA.

Lane, D. R., & Harrington, N. G. (2005, November). Electromyographic response as a measure of effortful cognitive processing. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the National Communication Association, Boston, MA.

Harrington, N. G., & Lane, D. R. (2005, July). Engaging adolescents with tailored multimedia technology to enhance interventions. Paper presented at the Tailoring Health Messages conference, Monte Verita, Switzerland.

Harrington, N. G., Lane, D. R., Zimmerman, R. S., Bevins, C. C., Fraze, T. K., & Harris, M. S. (2005, June). Targeted computer-based anti-marijuana prevention strategies for adolescents. Poster presented at the College of Problems on Drug Dependence satellite conference, Orlando, FL.

Harrington, N. G., Lane, D. R., Zimmerman, R. S., Lederer, K. M., Martin, C. A., & Kelly, T. H. (2005, June). The effects of targeted media-based prevention messages on marijuana use by high sensation and high cognition seeking young adults. Poster presented at the College of Problems on Drug Dependence convention, Orlando, FL.

Norling, G. R., & Harrington, N. G. (2004, October). Developing a theoretical model of rapport- building: Implications for physician-patient communication and medical education. Paper accepted for presentation at the World Conference of Family Doctors, Orlando, FL.

Norling, G. R., & Harrington, N. G. (2004, July). Communication and connectedness: Recapturing the humanity in the doctor-patient relationship through rapport-building. Paper presented at the Second International Conference on New Directions in the Humanities, Monash University Center in Prato, Italy.

Harrington, N. G., Lane, D. R., Donohew, L., Zimmerman, R. S., Norling, G. R., Cheah, W. H., McClure, L., & Bevins, C. (2003, May). Improving persuasive strategies for media-based health campaigns. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the International Communication Association, San Diego, CA.

Kelly, T. K., Douglass, S. Robbins, G., Martin, C. A., Fillmore, M. T., Harrington, N. G., Bardo, M. J., Rush, C. R. (2003, June). Behavioral effects of amphetamine on high- and low- impulsive sensation seekers: A systematic replication. Poster presented at the Annual Convention of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence, Bal Harbour, FL.

Harrington, N. G., Cheah, W. H., Norling, G. R., Hoyle, R. H., Duvall, J. L., & Hansen, W. B. (2002, May). An evaluation of the community-based All Stars character education and problem behavior prevention program. Poster presented at the 10th Annual Meeting of the Society for Prevention Research, Seattle, WA.

Harrington, N. G., Norling, G. R., & Cheah, W. H. (2002, May). Challenges to implementing and evaluating community-based prevention programs. Poster presented at the 10th Annual Meeting of the Society for Prevention Research, Seattle, WA.

Kelly, T. H., Delzer, T., Martin, C. A., Hays, L. R., Harrington, N. G., Bardo, M. J., & Rush, C. R. (2002). Behavioral effects of amphetamine and diazepam in high and low sensation seekers. Poster presented at the annual convention of the College on the Problems of Drug Dependence.

Harrington, N. G. (2001, May). Increasing the effectiveness of anti-drug media messages. Presentation at the Society for Prevention Research Annual Conference, Washington, DC. (non-refereed)

Giles, S. M., Harrington, N. G., & Fearnow-Kenney, M. (November, 2000). Evaluation of the All Stars program: Student and teacher factors that influence mediators of substance use. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the National Communication Association, Seattle, CA.

Harrington, N. G., & Norling, G. R. (September, 2000). Communication competency curriculum for 3rd year family practice medical students. Poster presented at the International Conference on Health and Communication, Barcelona, Spain.

Donohew, L., Harrington, N. G., Lane, D. R., Zimmerman, R. S., & Kelly, T. (1999, May). Persuasive strategies for effective anti-drug messages. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the International Communication Association, San Francisco, CA.

Kelly, T.H., Delzer, T., Martin, C.A., Hays, L.R., Harrington, N. G., and Bardo, M.J. (1999). Behavioral Effects of Amphetamine and Diazepam in High- and Low-Sensation Seekers. Paper presented at the FASEB Summer Research Conference, entitled Biological Vulnerability To Alcoholism and Drug Addiction, Copper Mountain, CO.

Hansen, W. B., & Harrington, N. G. (1998, August). All-Stars: Character-based prevention. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the National Prevention Network, San Antonio, TX.

Turner, W. L., Clayton, R., & Harrington, N. G. (1998, August). Comprehensive drug prevention for high-risk youth. Paper presented at the annual conference of the National Medical Association, New Orleans, LA.

Bostrom, R. N., Prather, J. M., & Harrington, N. G. (1998, July). Birth order and communicative behavior. Paper presented at the annual convention of the International Communication Association, Jerusalem, Israel.

Harrington, N. G., Turner, W. L., Clayton, R. R., Miller T., Durden, D., Griffin, V., & Higgins, A. (1998, June). Universal and selective prevention intervention: A rural study. Paper presented at the annual conference of the Society for Prevention Research, Park City, UT.

Harrington, N. G., Forsythe, A., Helme, D., & Swigert, G. (1998, April). Health professions schools in service to the nation: The role of communication scholars on interdisciplinary health care teams. Presentation to the Kentucky Conference on Health Communication. (non-refereed)

Harrington, N. G., Giles, S. M., & Hoyle, R. (1997, November). Using character education in prevention: Effects on attitudes toward sex and sexual behavior among sixth and seventh grade students. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL.

Harrington, N. G., & Matthews, C. K. (1997, November). Shame-proneness among the invisibly disabled: Implications for communication with health care providers. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL.

Turner, W. L., Harrington, N. G., & Clayton, R. R. (1997, November). A substance abuse prevention intervention for high risk children and families. Paper presented at the annual conference of the National Council on Family Relations, Arlington, VA.

Turner, W. L., Clayton, R. R., & Harrington, N. G. (1997, September). Selective drug abuse prevention for youth at high risk. Paper presented at the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, Atlanta, GA.

Turner, W. L., Clayton, R. R., & Harrington, N. G. (1997, August). Targeted drug abuse prevention for 4th grade high risk students. Paper presented at the annual conference of the National Medical Association, Honolulu, HI.

Kelly, T., Delzer, T., Neff, J., Martin, C., Hays, L., Harrington, N. G., & Bardo, M. (1997, May). Behavioral effects of amphetamine and diazepam in high- and low-sensation seeking adults. Paper presented at the annual conference of the Society for Prevention Research, Baltimore, MD.

Harrington, N. G., (1996, April). A theory-based adolescent pregnancy prevention program. Presentation to the Kentucky Conference on Health Communication, Lexington, KY. (non- refereed)

Harrington, N. G., Clayton, R. R., Gillotti, C. M. (1995, June). Talking about alcohol and drugs among college students. Poster presented at the annual conference of the Society for Prevention Research, Scottsdale, AZ.

Hoyle, R., Clayton, R. R., Harrington, N. G., & Huffman, M. G. (1995, June). State-trait stability of sensation seeking in adolescents. Paper presented at the annual conference of the Society for Prevention Research, Scottsdale, AZ.

Harrington, N. G., Prather, J. M., & Donohew, L. (1994, November). A preliminary report of the effectiveness of a small-scale targeted substance abuse prevention program. Paper presented at annual convention of the Speech Communication Association, New Orleans, LA.

Dsilva, M., Harrington, N. G., Palmgreen, P., Donohew, L., & Lorch, E. P. (1994, November). Designing drug abuse prevention campaigns for the high sensation seeker. Paper presented at the annual convention of the Speech Communication Association, New Orleans, LA.

Martin, S., Grant, N. E., Helm, D. M, Clayton, R., & Donohew, R. L., (1990, August). Causes of drug use in early adolescence: An analysis of the interplay between peer group influences and individual personality characteristics. Paper presented at the annual convention of the American Sociological Association, Washington, DC.

Bostrom, R. N., Davis, W. L., Grant, N. E., & Einerson, M. J. (1990, June). Don't stop me even if you HAVE heard this one: Attitudes of the compulsive talker. Paper presented at the annual convention of the International Communication Association, Dublin, Ireland.

Shatzer, M. J., Kailing, J., Davis, W. L., Gold, P., Grant, N. E., Hunter, P., & Kind, K. (1990, June). The effects of international news exposure on attitudes, opinions, and knowledge: A preliminary report. Paper presented at the annual convention of the International Communication Association, Dublin, Ireland.

Coyle, K., & Grant, N. E. (1989, November). Perceived dimensions in regulative messages. Paper presented at the annual convention of the Speech Communication Association, San Francisco, CA.

Donohew, L., Palmgreen, P., Lorch, E., Rogus, M., Helm, D., & Grant, N. E. (1989, May). Sensation seeking and targeting of televised anti-drug PSAs. Paper presented at the annual convention of the International Communication Association, San Francisco, CA.

Grant, N. E., & Donohew, L. (1989, April). Physiological measurement in communication research. Paper presented at the annual convention of the Southern States Communication Association, Louisville, KY.

Kerr, A. M., Harrington, N. G., & Scott, A. M. (2015, April). Communication during first-time multidisciplinary clinic visits: Understanding parental decision making and information management in pediatric chronic illness. Poster presented at the biennial District of Columbia Health Communication Conference, Fairfax, VA. Honorable Mention Research Presentation.

Haas, J. W., & Grant, N. E. (1989, April). Perspectives on message behavior. Paper presented at the annual convention of the Southern States Communication Association, Louisville, KY.

Refereed Journal Articles

Streeter, A. R., Harrington, N. G., & Lane, D. R. (2015). Communication behaviors associated with the competent nursing handoff. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 43(3), 294-314.

Aldrich, R. S., Harrington, N. G., & Cerel, J. (2014). The willingness to intervene against suicide questionnaire. Death Studies, 38, 100-108.

Head, K. J., Noar, S. M., Iannarino, N. T., & Harrington, N. G. (2013). Efficacy of text messaging- based interventions for health promotion: A meta-analysis. Social Science & Medicine, 97, 41-48.

Harrington, N. G., & Noar, S. M. (2012). Reporting standards for studies of tailored interventions. Health Education Research, 27(2), 331-342. doi: 10.1093/her/CYR108

Dai, M., Giles, S. M., & Harrington, N. G. (2016). Investigating the influences of person-centeredness and source qualification on patient-provider communication through EMR systems. International Journal of Electronic Healthcare, 9(1), 1-18.

Record, R. A., Helme, D., Savage, M. W., & Harrington, N. G. (2017). Let's clear the air: A campaign that effectively increased compliance with a university’s tobacco-free policy. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 45(1), 79-95.

Record, R. A., Harrington, N. G., Helme, D., & Savage, M. W. (in press). Using the theory of planned behavior to guide focus group development of messages aimed at increasing compliance with a tobacco-free policy. American Journal of Health Promotion.

Harrington, N. G., & Kerr, A. M. (in press). Revisiting risk: Prospect theory application in persuasive health message design. Health Communication.

Kelly, T. H., Robbins, G., Martin, C. A., Fillmore, M., Lane, S. D., Harrington, N. G., & Rush, C. R. (2006). Individual differences in drug use vulnerability: d-amphetamine and sensation seeking status. Psychopharmacology, 189(1), 17-25.

Harrington, N. G., Norling, G. R., Witte, F., Taylor, J. A., & Andrews, J. (2007). The effects of communication skills training on pediatricians' and parents' communication during "sick child" visits. Health Communication, 21(2), 105-114.

Gray, J. B., & Harrington, N. G. (2011). Narrative and framing: A test of an integrated message strategy in the exercise context. Journal of Health Communication, 16(3), 264-281.

Noar, S. M., Harrington, N. G., Van Stee, S. K., & Aldrich, R. S. (2011). Tailored health communication to change lifestyle behaviors. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 5(2), 112-122. (Selected as the cornerstone article for a ""themed"" issue of the journal.)

Kelly, T. H., Delzer, T. A., Martin, C. A., Harrington, N. G., Hays, L. R., & Bardo, M. T. (2009). Performance and subjective effects of diazepam and d-amphetamine in high and low sensation seekers. Behavioural Pharmacology, 20(5-6), 505-517.

Noar, S. M., Harrington, N. G., & Helme, D. W. (2010). The contributions of health communication research to campaign practice. Health Communication, 25, 593-594.

Lane, D. R., Harrington, N. G., Donohew, L., Zimmerman, R. S. (2008). Dimensions and validation of a Perceived Message Cognition Value (PMCV) scale. Communication Research Reports, 23(3), 149-161.

Harrington, N. G., Lane, D. R., Donohew, L., & Zimmerman, R. S. (2006). An extension of the Activation Model of Information Exposure: The addition of a cognitive variable to a model of attention. Media Psychology, 8, 139-164.

Kelly, T. H., Robbins, G., Martin, C. A., Fillmore, M., Lane, S. D., Harrington, N. G., & Rush, C. R. (2006). Individual differences in drug use vulnerability: d-amphetamine and sensation seeking status. Psychopharmacology, 189(1), 17-25.

Fahringer, D., Assell, R., Harrington, N. G., Maschio, G., & Stone, L. (2000). Integrating service- learning as a course into a university curriculum. Journal of Perspective on Physician Assistant Education, 11(3), 161-164.

McNeal, R. B., Jr., Hansen, W. B., Harrington, N. G., & Giles, S. M. (2004). How All Stars works: An examination of program effects on mediating variables. Health Education & Behavior, 31, 165-178. (Lawrence W. Green Best Paper of the Year Award, selected by the Editorial Board of Health Education & Behavior).

Harrington, N. G., Lane, D. R., Donohew, L., Zimmerman, R. S., Norling, G. R., An, J., Cheah, W. H., McClure, L., Buckingham, T., Garofalo, E., & Bevins, C. C. (2003). Persuasive strategies for effective anti-drug messages. Communication Monographs, 70(1), 16-30.

Bostrom, R. N., Lane, D. R., & Harrington, N. G. (2002). Music as persuasion: Creative mechanisms for enacting academe. American Communication Journal, 6(1). http://acjournal.org/holdings/vol6/iss1/special/bostrom.htm

Giles, S. M., Harrington, N. G., & Fearnow-Kenney, M. (2002). Evaluation of the All Stars program: Student and teacher factors that influence mediators of substance use. Journal of Drug Education, 31(4), 385-397.

Harrington, N. G., & Donohew, L. (1997). Jump Start: A targeted drug abuse prevention program. Health Education and Behavior, 24(5), 568-586.

Kelly, T. H., Delzer, T., Martin, C. A., Hays, L. R., Harrington, N. G., Bardo, M. J., & Rush, C. R. (2002). Behavioral effects of amphetamine and diazepam in high and low sensation seekers. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 66 (supplement 1), S91-S92.

Bardo, M., Donohew, L., & Harrington, N. G. (1996). Psychobiology of novelty seeking and drug seeking behavior. Behavioural Brain Research, 77, 1-21.

Dsilva, M., Harrington, N. G., Palmgreen, P., Donohew, L., & Lorch, E. P. (2001). Drug use prevention for the high sensation seeker: The role of alternative activities. Substance Use and Misuse, 36(3), 373-385.

Harrington, N. G. (1995). The effects of college students' alcohol resistance strategies. Health Communication, 7(4), 371-391.

Harrington, N. G., Giles, S. M., Hoyle, R. H., Feeney, G. J., & Yungbluth, S. C. (2001). Evaluation of the All Stars character education and problem behavior prevention program: Effects on mediator and outcome variables for middle school students. Health Education & Behavior, 28(5), 533-546.

Palmgreen, P., Donohew, L., Lorch, E. P., Rogus, M., Helm, D., & Grant, N. E. (1991). Sensation seeking, message sensation value, and drug use as mediators of PSA effectiveness. Health Communication, 3(4), 217-227.

Bostrom, R. N., & Harrington, N. G. (1999). An exploratory investigation of the characteristics of compulsive talkers. Communication Education, 48, 73-80.

Harrington, N. G., Brigham, N. L., & Clayton, R. R. (1999). Alcohol risk reduction for fraternity and sorority members. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 60(4), 521-527.

Harrington, N. G. (1997). Strategies used by college students to persuade peers to drink. The Southern Communication Journal, 62(3), 229-242.

Harrington, N. G., Brigham, N. L., & Clayton, R. R. (1997). Differences in alcohol use and alcohol-related problems among fraternity and sorority members. Drug & Alcohol Dependence, 47, 237-246.

Lane, D. R., Harrington, N. G., Donohew, L., Zimmerman, R. S. (2008). Dimensions and validation of a Perceived Message Cognition Value (PMCV) scale. Communication Research Reports, 23(3), 149-161.

Holmes, G. N., Harrington, N. G., & Parrish, A. J. (2010). Exploring the relationship between pediatrician self-disclosure and parent satisfaction. Communication Research Reports, 27(4), 1-5.

Publications: Chapters and Invited Articles

Harrington, N. G. (forthcoming). Persuasive health message design. In J. Nussbaum (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopedia of communication. New York: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190228613.013.7

Harrington, N. G. (forthcoming). Health disparities. In R. Parrott (Ed.), Oxford encyclopedia of health and risk message design processing. New York: Oxford University Press.

Harrington, N. G. (forthcoming). Sensation seeking. In R. Parrott (Ed.), Oxford encyclopedia of health and risk message design processing. New York: Oxford University Press.

Harrington, N. G. (in press). Introduction to the special issue: Message design in health communication research. Health Communication

Harrington, N. G. (2015). Health communication: An introduction to theory, method, and application. In N. G. Harrington (Ed.), Health communication: Theory, method, and application (pp. 1-27). New York: Routledge.

Harrington, N. G. (2015). Epilogue. In N. G. Harrington (Ed.), Health communication: Theory, method, and application (pp. 483-488). New York: Routledge.

Harrington, N. G., & Duggan, A. (2015). Mental health and illness. In N. G. Harrington (Ed.), Health communication: Theory, method, and application (pp. 269-296). New York: Routledge.

Harrington, N. G., & Head, K. J. (2015). New technologies in health communication. In N. G. Harrington (Ed.), Health communication: Theory, method, and application (pp. 331-363). New York: Routledge.

Holmes, G. N., & Harrington, N. G. (2015). The patient experience. In N. G. Harrington (Ed.), Health communication: Theory, method, and application (pp. 31-58). New York: Routledge.

Harrington, N. G., Helme, D. W., & Noar, S. M. (2015). Message design strategies for risk behavior prevention. In L. M. Scheier (Ed.), Handbook of adolescent drug use prevention: Research, intervention strategies, and practice. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Harrington, N. G., Palmgreen, P. C., & Donohew, L. (in press). Programmatic research to increase the effectiveness of health communication campaigns. Journal of Health Communication.

Noar, S. M., & Harrington, N. G. (forthcoming). Tailored communications for health-related decision-making and behavior change. In M. A. Diefenbach, S. M. Miller, & D. J. Bowen (Eds.), Handbook of health and decision science. New York: Springer.

Holmes, G. N., & Harrington, N. G. (2014). Doctor-patient communication. In T. L. Thompson & G. Golson (Eds.), The encyclopedia of health communication (pp. 368-373). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Harrington, N. G. (2013). Introduction to the special issue: Communication strategies to reduce health disparities. Journal of Communication, 63(1), 1-7.

Harrington, N. G., & Noar, S. M. (2012). Building an evidence base for eHealth applications: Research questions and practice implications. In S. M. Noar & N. G. Harrington (Eds.), eHealth applications: Promising strategies for behavior change (pp. 263-274). New York: Routledge.

Noar, S. M., & Harrington, N. G. (2012). eHealth applications: An introduction and overview. In S. M. Noar & N. G. Harrington (Eds.), eHealth applications: Promising strategies for behavior change (pp. 3-16). New York: Routledge.

Noar, S. M., & Harrington, N. G. (2012). Computer-tailored interventions for improving health behaviors. In S. M. Noar & N. G. Harrington (Eds.), eHealth applications: Promising strategies for behavior change (pp. 126-146). New York: Routledge.

Lane, D. R., & Harrington, N. G. (2009). Electromyographic response as a measure of effortful cognitive processing. In M. J. Beatty, J. C. McCroskey, & K. Floyd (Eds.), Biological dimensions of communication: Perspectives, methods and research (pp.115-129). Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Harrington, N. G. (2006). Introduction to the 75th issue of Health Communication: Emerging issues in health communication Ð The 2006 Kentucky Conference on Health Communication. Health Communication, 20(2), 113-115.

Harrington, N. G. (2005). Just say...??? What to say when you want to say ÒNoÓ to a drink. In M. Fearnow-Kenney & D. L. Wyrick (Eds.), Alcohol awareness: Readings for college students (pp. 71-82). Lynchburg, VA: Progress Printing.

Donohew, R. L., Palmgreen, P., Zimmerman, R. S., Harrington, N. G., & Lane, D. R. (2003). Health risk takers and prevention. In D. Romer (Ed.), Reducing adolescent risk (pp. 165- 170). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Donohew, L., Palmgreen, P., Lorch, E. P., Zimmerman, R., & Harrington, N. G. (2002). Attention, persuasive communication, and prevention. In W. Crano & M. Burgoon (Eds.), Mass media and drug prevention: Classic and contemporary theories and research (pp. 119-143). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Harrington, N. G. (2002). Funded research in communication: A chairpersonÕs perspective. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 30(4), 393-401.

Palmgreen, P., Donohew, L., & Harrington, N. G. (2001). Sensation seeking in anti-drug campaign and message design. In R. Rice and C. Atkin (Eds.), Public communication campaigns (3rd ed., pp. 300-304). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Harrington, N. G., Hoyle, R., Giles, S. M., & Hansen, W. B. (2000). The All Stars prevention program. In W. B. Hansen, S. M. Giles, & M. D. Fearnow-Kenney (Eds.), Improving prevention effectiveness (pp. 203-212). Greensboro, NC: Tanglewood Research.

Matthews, C. K., & Harrington, N. G. (1999). Invisible disabilities. In D. Braithwaite and T. L. Thompson (Eds.), Handbook of communication and people with disabilities: Research and application (pp. 405-421). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Harrington, N. G., & Bostrom, R. N. (1997). Objectivism as the basic context for theory and research in communication. In J. L. Owen (Ed.), Context and communication behavior (pp. 118-143). Context Press.

Clayton, R. R., Leukefeld, C. G., Harrington, N. G., & Cattarello, A. (1996). D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education): Very popular but not very effective. In C. B. McCoy, L. Metsch, & J. A. Inciardi (Eds.), Intervening with drug involved youth. Beverly Hills: Sage.

Donohew, L., & Harrington, N. G. (1996). Prevention: Shaping mass-media messages to vulnerable groups. In J. Jaffe (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Drugs and Alcohol (pp. 853-856). New York: Macmillan.

Clayton, R. R., Leukefeld, C. G., Donohew, L., Bardo, M., & Harrington, N. G. (1995). Risk and protective factors: A brief review. Drugs & Society, 8(3/4), 7-14.

Palmgreen, P., Lorch, E. P., Donohew, L., Harrington, N. G., Dsilva, M., & Helm, D. (1995). Reaching at-risk populations in a mass media drug abuse prevention campaign: Sensation seeking as a targeting variable. Drugs and Society, 8(3/4), 29-45. Published simultaneously in C. G. Leukefeld (Ed.), Drug prevention: Research and practice (pp. 29- 45). West Hazleton, PA: Haworth Press.

Books

Harrington, N. G. (Ed.) (2015). Health communication: Theory, method, and application. New York: Routledge.

Noar, S. M., & Harrington, N. G. (Eds.) (2012). e-Health applications: Promising strategies for behavior change. New York: Routledge.

Harrington, N. G. (Ed.) (2015). Health communication: Theory, method, and application. New York: Routledge.