COMMUNICATION 525

ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

INSTRUCTOR: DR. J. DAVID JOHNSON
OFFICE: 105 Grehan Bldg
TELEPHONE: 257-3874
OFFICE HOURS: M 9:30-11:00, W 9:30-11:00, & BY APPOINTMENT (make appointments with Louise Menifee, 131 Grehan, 257-7805)
E-MAIL: jdj@uky.edu

WEB PAGE: Dean J. David Johnson's Page
FAX: 323-9879

SECTION: 001
CLASS HOURS: 8-9:15
CLASSROOM: 223 Grehan (EGJ)


I. Textbooks

Galbraith, J. R. (1995). Designing organizations: An executive briefing on strategy, structure, and process. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. (G).

Johnson, J. D. (1993). Organizational communication structure. Norwood, NJ: ABLEX. (J) (Royalties from the sale of this book at the University of Kentucky are donated to endowed scholarship funds in the College of Communications and Information Studies.)

II. Reserve Reading/Ned's Packet

Additional readings are on reserve in the reading room. See the assignments listed on the class schedule for more information on these readings. These readings are also available in a course packet from Johnny Print Copy Shop, 547 S. Limestone St., 254-6139, as are the PowerPoint lectures. An earlier version of the lectures are also available on the web site.

III. Course Objectives
    A. To provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of organizational communication structure.
    B. To provide the student with a comprehensive perspective of information processing and systems within organizations.
    C. To develop student analytical skills, especially for professions such as research, consulting, and management.
IV. Rationale

All of us have had or will have numerous opportunities to play a part in the functioning of organizations in business, government, industry, education, and so on. This course is designed to provide insight into the communication that serves as the lifeblood of these organized institutions. Those who wish to have a significant role in the management of others, who wish to improve their understanding of organizations, who wish to understand how groups and individuals fit into the larger organization, and who desire to become more effective communicators in organizations will find taking this course worthwhile.

This course is primarily designed to give students a background in theories, perspectives, concepts, and approaches to understanding communication structure in organizations. Thus, it seeks to promote student understanding, analytical skills, and critical thinking necessary for such professions as consulting, research, and management and for their own personal survival in large organizations. It does not seek to specifically impart such oral communication skills as group discussion or interviewing to students. This course is designed to be an advanced course in Organizational Communication. Students are expected to be familiar with the material taught in the introductory course, Communication 325, Business and Industrial Communication.

V. Assignments and Points
Assignments Points
Network Analysis Assignment 250
Structural-functional Analysis 200
Case Study 400
Final 150
Total 1000
VI. Grade Distribution
Points Grade
880 ~ 1000 A
800 ~ 879 B
720 ~ 799 C
600 ~ 719 D
less than 600 E
VII. Course Procedures
    A. Late work

    Late work will not be authorized for job interviews, vacations, concerts, hangovers, mood swings, and so on. Late work will be accepted without penalty only if:
    (1) authorized by instructor before the due date and/or
    (2) an authorized medical or other serious excuse is provided. If these conditions are not met, then 10% of the points for the assignment will be deducted for every school day, or fraction thereof, that it is late.

    B. Doing your own work

    Cheating and plagiarism are defined in the Student Rights and Responsibilities in Sections 6.3.1 and 6.3.2. The minimal penalty at UK is a failure for the entire course that cannot be erased. Website for academic sanctions: University of Kentucky Student Rights and Responsibilities.

    C. Extra credit

    No extra credit will be permitted.

    D. Attendance

    Students should be aware that for successful completion of the assignments regular attendance is a must. While the instructor is readily available to help students in clarifying material discussed in class, he should not be expected to conduct private tutorials for students who do not attend regular class sessions.

    E. Classroom Courtesy

    In all academic environments it is important that a person respect others who have come to learn. Personal conversations should not occur when the instructors or other students are presenting material. Also, you would be offended (and rightfully so) if we spent your class time reading the newspaper or engaging in other irrelevant and distracting tasks. Please accord presenters the same respect.


TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

Unit # 1: Approaches to Communication Structure

DATE LECTURE ASSIGNMENT
Jan 12 LEC 1*: INTRO J 1
17   Martin Luther King Academic Holiday
19 LEC 2: FORMAL BASICS J 2, G 1
24 FORMAL BASICS (CONTINUED) G 2, pp. 19-30
26 LEC 3: ADVANCED FORMAL  
31 ADVANCED FORMAL (CONTINUED)  
FEB 2,7 ADVANCED FORMAL (CONTINUED)  
9 LEC 4: NETWORKS BASICS FARACE, MONGE, & RUSSELL (FMR) 8,10; J 3
14 LEC 5: NETWORK SAMPLE  
16 LEC 6: NETWORK BAFFLE  
21,23 NETWORK BAFFLE(CONTINUED)  
28 LEC 7: INFORMATION ENVIRONMENTS FMR 5
March 1 LEC 8: INTEROGANIZATIONAL G 6, 7, 8, pp.30-39
Network Analysis
Assignment #1 Due
----

* LEC numbering for web site and for Johnny package of lecture notes.

Unit # 2: Communication Systems

MAR 6 LEC 9: INFORMATION PROCESSING  
8 LEC 10: COMMUNICATION EFFECTIVENESS  
20 SIMULATION  
22 LEC 11: SYSTEMS KATZ & KAHN 2
27 STRUCTURAL FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS FMR 3
29 STRUCTURAL FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS (CONTINUED)  

Unit # 3: CONTEXTS

APR 3 LEC 12: PHYSICAL J 4, 6
5 LEC 13: TECHNOLOGY J 7, G 4,5
Structural Functional Analysis Due
10 LEC 14: CULTURE J 5
12 LEC 15: RELATIONAL COMM J 8
  LEC 16: INDIVIDUAL OUTCOMES J 9
  LEC 17: COGNITION  
17 LEC 18: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY  
19 LEC 19a: MARKETS  
  LEC 19b: MULTINATIONALS CASE STUDY DUE
24 LEC 20: INNOVATION J 10
26 LEC 21: METHODS  
  LEC 22: SUMMING UP J 11 G 9, pp 37-39
May 3 FINAL EXAM 8-10  

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

J. DAVID JOHNSON (Ph.D, Michigan State University, 1978) has been Dean of the College of Communications and Information Studies at the University of Kentucky since August of 1998. He has also held academic positions at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Arizona State University, the State University of New York at Buffalo, and Michigan State University and was a media research analyst for the U. S. Information Agency. He has published three books: Cancer-related information seeking (Hampton Press), Information seeking: An organizational dilemma (Quorum Books), and Organizational communication structure (Ablex). He has been recognized as among the one-hundred most prolific publishers of refereed journal articles in the history of the communication discipline. He has served on three editorial boards and has been a consulting editor for a score professional journals. He has also received grants from the National Cancer Institute, Michigan Department of Public Health, Michigan Department of Transportation, and National Association of Broadcasters. He has worked extensively in an advisory capacity for various state and federal agencies in the field of health and, while an internship director, developed working relationships with scores of organizations. Currently he is serving on the advisory board of WUKY and the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging.

An Overview of Dr. Johnson's Teaching Philosophy and Style

I believe in an active, empirically based approach to undergraduate education. Perhaps the critical skill you will need later on in your career is a set of techniques you can apply to problems. The primary focus of this class is on developing your analytical skills. To this end, we will also do a number of experiential exercises and case study analyses during the semester.

Classic 'book learning' through reading is something I expect that an active, engaged learner will do throughout their career. Students learn by doing, and in the process learn how to learn. It is much more difficult; however, to develop on you're own, later on, a systematic means of approaching problems. I assume that all students are committed to learning and that it is the most important thing they are doing. I believe that what you get out of class largely depends on what you put into it and that this applies to myself as well.


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